White And Grey Kitchens Dallas Style

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Photo courtesy of Charlotte Comer Interiors, Inc. Interior design by Charlotte Comer ASID RID

White kitchens never seem to go out of style, but there’s a fine line between white that’s beautiful and white’s that clinical. If you love white and grey, but don’t want your kitchen to resemble a hospital room, try these tips from Dallas’ top interior designers and kitchen planners.

Often called the New Chicago, Dallas is coming into its own as an interior design capital thanks to nationally recognized names such as Charlotte Comer, ASID RID.

“White and grey are eternal,” said Comer. “You never get tired of the combination, but there are ways of using them that make the look successful.”

Comer believes a monochromatic color palette works best if the client wants their interiors to stand the test of time, but monochromatic doesn’t mean all the same hue. For this contemporary kitchen, Comer used Decorator’s White and Ozark Shadows by Benjamin Moore (cut by 75%.) palest grey anchored by whispered natural hardwoods to achieve a pristine harmony. The waterfall island countertop in Bianca Quartzite by Aria Stone Gallery is the only pattern.

The picture window was greatly enlarged to bring the outdoors into the kitchen. “With white and grey, suggests Comer, “edited use of color becomes more important. So choose statement paintings, accessories and sculptures wisely. And a beautiful view can be all the vibrant color you need.”

Kitchen planner Helene Terry accented the purity factor with hidden appliances and touch cabinetry. “The reason discerning clients love white is that it’s clean,” said Terry, “but white can be as challenging as any other color. That’s why it’s important that everyone on the team works well together, so we all know what we mean by BM Ozark Shadows 25%.”

Terry worked with General Contractor Ronny Henderson on the contemporary kitchen pictured below which features bookmatched Crema Calacutta marble as the main focal point. The colors in the countertop, cabinetry and floors pick up the tranquil veins of sandy beige in the statement piece stone. “You want the whites and greys to appear curated because they are when you factor in everything else besides wall color,” advises Terry.

A final way to do white and grey well is by pairing them with a little color, as this transitional Dallas high-rise kitchen demonstrates. Interior Designer Dona Rosene used this beachy palette of whites, driftwood and blue to remind her clients of their East Coast seaside home. She used Benjamin Moore’s Cotton Balls on the ceiling, and used Sherwin Williams’ Creamy on the molding to transition to Benjamin Moore’s Beachglass. The color choices complement the sunny suburban Dallas skyline.

“White makes everything else pop,” says Rosene. “In this home, the ceiling looks crisp against the light warm gray on the cabinets and the Beachglass on the walls. The effect is cheerful and calming, like a vacation by the sea.”

Whites and greys have to be chosen in the home and the home has to have good light. “That way, you can see the undertones,” advises Rosene. “Do the whites and greys go too pink, too yellow or too blue? The right tone makes a room appear warm while the wrong tone makes it feel cold and drab.”

Remember what you want from white. Look for colors that are calming, clean as opposed to muddy, and use paint with a matte finish or soft eggshell finish to avoid hot spots and reduce glare.