melting-watch

MARKET WATCH

Single Family Home Activity in the Antelope Valley

In the last 24 hours
08/16/17

New Listings …  22
Sold …  18
Pending …  40
Expd/Wthd/Cancld …  07
Price Increases …  00
Price Reductions …  10
Number of listings* …  1072
Average Days on Market …  77
Short sale/pay listings …  15
Equity listings …  920
Bank owned listings …  18
HUD, Corp, Probate and Auction listings …  39
Days of inventory (at the average rate**) …  25.91
Days of inventory (at yesterdays rate**) …  42.88
Actual Number of days of inventory***  …  357.33

View the last 8+ years of data HERE!

SELECT THE CHART TO VIEW
(each will open a new tab)

New Listings on the Market

Closed (Sold) Transactions

Pending Units

Expired Listings

Price Increases

Price Decreases

Total Number of Listings

Days of Inventory 

Average Selling Price

Monthly Selling Price Points
(Price extremes at the end of the month)

Daily Day’s on the Market

Monthly Day’s on the Market

Total Sort Pays

Sold by Month

Total Sales in Last 12 Months

Avg. Number of Solds per Month over 12 Months

 

* Count includes all ACTIVE and CONTINGENT MLS listings
** Assuming no future growth or reduction
*** At yesterdays depletion rate (∞ indicates negative depletion,
inventory would not be depleted at this sales rate)
ALL DATA WAS DERIVED FROM THE “GREATER ANTELOPE VALLEY
ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®” AND IS DEEMED RELIABLE.
THE CALCULATIONS OF THAT DATA IS THE
RESPONSIBILITY OF DON GOCKEL, REALTOR®

Savvy Buyers Search Out ‘Visual Disasters’

WRITTEN BY

Savvy Buyers Search Out 'Visual Disasters'

Instead of shopping for your dream home, why not search out your dream discount?

First-time buyers can be distracted by the superficial. They can be enticed to pay for dream-home fantasies or, alternatively, encouraged to walk away from a hidden gem—a visual disaster.

  • Buy a home which was cleverly staged and marketed to make buyers rush to put in an offer, and you may be paying for more for hype and distracting “veneer.”
  • Dismiss a property because it’s a visual disaster, without assessing its true value to you, and you may lose a lot more.

Visual disaster is my label for a solid, well-located home that is structurally-sound and in relatively-good condition, but—and it’s a big but—it looks (and possibly smells) awful— but sells at a significant discount.

Smart sellers and their real estate professionals know the magic of fresh paint, the allure of professionally-staged interiors, and the appeal of cosmetic make-overs.

  • They understand which current “hot” features local buyers are willing to pay more for.
  • Generating multiple offers has become commonplace, pitting buyer against buyer to drive purchase prices higher.

A few thousand dollars worth of touch-ups and problem solving by sellers, can convert into tens of thousands more paid by buyers. Great for sellers, but is this really how you want to spend your hard-earned dollars?

Buyers who would prefer to invest their money in the best possible location and a solid, sound structure—not superficial trimmings and flash done to someone else’s taste and standards—may benefit from shopping for a visual disaster.

Caution: Thorough home inspection, ideally by a structural engineer, is essential to verify the home is structurally sound without any super-expensive repair necessary. Search out a reputable, skilled inspection firm before you start looking at properties. Other experienced “eyes”&mdesign;contractors, designers, renovation-experienced property owners, your real estate professional—will also be helpful when viewing visual disasters.

Tasteless decor, scary color schemes, extreme pet-smells, overwhelming clutter…these are just a few ugly turnoffs that discourage buyers. For savvy home buyers these negatives may signal hidden value and money-saving opportunity.

A house, townhome, or condominium unit that does not look like something out of a magazine—has not had the benefit of professional repainting, staging, or cosmetic overhaul—will sell for less…in some markets, considerably less. These properties may also take longer to sell, so there can be more room for negotiation.

Buyers who are ready to contribute “sweat equity” to their purchase can end up thousands and thousands of dollars ahead. “Sweat equity” involves getting your hands dirty to uncover “good bones” and hidden

value, paying a professional to do the necessary design or physical work, or a combination of both approaches.

Depending on what the superficial “disaster” problems are, buyers have choices once they become owners:

  • They can overhaul the “visual disaster” themselves before moving in or hire professionals to tackle the more difficult aspects and then take on the rest.
  • New owners can decide to live with some or all of the “visual disaster” for a while. Then, hire professionals to make the necessary changes. Having lived in the home a while, owners discover what will really work for them.
  • If new owners have friends or family with renovation skills and knowledge, learning how to cost-effectively uncover the value in their hidden gem can be less daunting.

Here are a few common visual disasters to keep an eye out for:

  • Color Me Crazy: Many listed homes are painted white or in pale neutrals to make it easier for buyers to visualize the property with their own furnishings. Loud, clashing, or just plain “wrong” color schemes can make rooms seem smaller, darker, and less appealing. Many buyers can’t think past strong colors to consider the true potential of spaces. Learn to visualize beyond crazy decor to discover value.
  • Tired and Severely Dated: If an older home is wall-to-wall “original everything,” that may be a buyer turn-off. But scrape away the dust and grime, deal with wood paneling overkill, paint with your color choices, and refinish floors or add new carpeting, and the refreshed property will sparkle. Your cost should be significantly less than what you’d pay for the seller’s version of their “for sale” make over.
  • Stinky Premises Animal smells (cat urine is a killer) and discoloration from long-term smoking are two definite buyer turn offs. Many can’t get past a dirty property. Remove the broadloom and have the building professionally sanitized or tackle some cleaning yourself. There’s value under all of that ugh.
  • “What Were You Thinking” Design: What odd personal improvement or layout change has the seller made that is a total turn off to everyone else? Badly-installed spiral staircase? Transformed the diningroom into a bedroom? If it’s one bad feature and the home is otherwise sound, get a couple of quotes on fixing this problem. Your real estate professional will understand how your offer to purchase can reflect this extra cost—either a lower offer price and you pay for it or ask the seller to make the repair or at least share the cost.
  • Street De-faced: If the yard is a mess and the property is unappealing from the curb, many buyers will stay in their cars. Concentrate on where value lies: location and structural soundness. Get a quote or two on improving landscaping or correcting the street face to back up your offer price. Later you can decide how much to do yourself.

Talk to your real estate professional, friends, family, and local contractors to get a feel for what may work in your area. Collect a few ballpark quotes for painting, cleaning, and other possible undertakings to get an accurate feel for costs before you start looking at properties. Pull together a team of experienced people you can call on for knowledgeable input, so you’ll be ready when a possible “visual disaster” appears.

Do your homework and you can turn a visual disaster into your dream home at a great price!

Clever Ways To Create More Storage In Your Kitchen

WRITTEN BY JAYMI NACIRI

Clever Ways To Create More Storage In Your Kitchen

Who doesn’t need more storage in the kitchen? You may not have a massive space with dozens of cabinets and yards of countertops, but that doesn’t mean you don’t have the space you need to store all your stuff. Use a few of these clever tricks and you might be surprised how much extra room you can create.

Dining table storage

Getting creative with your dining space doesn’t have to mean adding another piece of furniture. In a smaller space that can’t accommodate a server or sideboard, how about a table with hidden storage under the eating surface?

Spice it up

Limited cabinet or countertop space can make it hard to store and view your spices, but a simple drawer hack can change that.

“Storing spices in a drawer rather than a wall-mounted rack ensures seasonings are handy for cooking while preserving their delicate flavors by protecting them from sunlight, moisture and heat,” said HGTV. Use the $3.99 VARIERA spice insert from IKEA for an inexpensive solution.


hgtv.com
Build in a wine rack

Don’t have space for the wine cellar you want? Build a cool wine rack right into your island.


hgtv.com
Transform your pantry

A small pantry space can be difficult not just from a space perspective but also because a narrow but deep space can make it hard to see what’s there and access all of your goods. For as little as a couple hundred dollars, you can transform your pantry into a pull-out, which maximizes your space and gives you easy access to everything inside.


pinterest.com
Add a retractable pot rack

Perhaps the issue isn’t so much about lack of space but lack of usable space when it comes to your pots and pans. Oftentimes, the cabinet intended for these items is one large box that makes it hard to keep the area neat and be able to easily find what you need without making a bigger mess. This DIY rack solves that problem and frees up space at the bottom of the cabinet for other items.


architectureartdesigns.com
Creative pot racks

Don’t have the space for all your pots and pans in a cabinet? Many homeowners choose to go the overhead pot rack route, but, if you don’t have the headroom for that or just don’t care for that solution, how about this one: “A floating shelf (that) can also double as a floating pan rack,” said Architecture Art Designs. Not only does this allow

you to display your nice cookware prominently and keep it within easy reach while bringing in a natural element, it’s perfect for a space in need of a focal point.


architectureartdesigns.com
Banquette storage

If you’re doing a custom banquette, it’s easy enough to incorporate drawers underneath – the perfect place to keep all those things you don’t need every day but don’t want to store in the garage, like fancy dinnerware and silverware, tablecloths, and holiday serving pieces.


decoist.com
Easily accessible drawers that slide out from the end also make a great place to keep kids’ art supplies.


pinterest.com
You can also buy ready-made pieces for your dining room or breakfast nook, like this bench with a seat that lifts up to accommodate your storage needs.