Nine House Cleaning Tasks That Give You A Great Workout

WRITTEN BY JAYMI NACIRI

Nine House Cleaning Tasks That Give You A Great Workout

House cleaning is a drag. That comes as a surprise to no one. But, there is a great side benefit to having a tidy home. Well, there are many, but we’re not talking about the psychological advantages of living in a clean home or even the fact that a clean house just plain looks good. We’re talking about working up a sweat. Go ahead and skip the gym. Grab the broom or the vacuum cleaner instead. Turns out the simple acts of sweeping, vacuuming, and so many more housecleaning tasks can give you a great workout.

“You probably know that the U.S. Surgeon General recommends 30 minutes of moderate exercise at least five days a week to maintain good health,” said Weight Watchers. “But did you know that any kind of physical activity counts, including housework? Believe it or not, dusting, sweeping, mopping, making beds and carrying laundry all add up to a lot of ‘incidental activity – the type some health experts view as potentially more beneficial than ‘official’ workouts, such as calisthenics.”

So how many calories are we talking here? “According to Health Status, a 150-lb. individual would burn 99 calories doing 30 minutes of housework,” said LIVESTRONG. But the calorie burn varies depending on the activity – and your body weight; consider that the more you weigh, the more calories you burn.


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Dusting

Dusting can burn 80 calories in 30 minutes, and give you a good arm and shoulder workout. Want to burn even more? Add weights to wrists and/or ankles for this and any other task. “The American Council on Exercise promotes the use of weights to increase exercise benefit,” said Health magazine. “You can add this to your everyday life by using ankle or wrist weights. Just adding weights can burn 25-50% more calories during your everyday activities – no gym required!”

Washing dishes

“Some activities are more vigorous than others. A 150-lb. person washing dishes for 30 minutes would burn approximately 77 calories, according to Health Status,” said LIVESTRONG.

Cleaning your windows

Improve your view and get a good arm workout at the same time. Washing your windows for a half hour can burn 100 calories.

Laundry

Few of us enjoy the task of doing laundry, but, while you’re putting clothes in the washer, moving them to the dryer, sorting, folding, and hanging, think about this: an hour’s worth of these tasks can burn 68 calories. It’s not as much as hitting the bike at cycling class, but at least now you have something clean to wear when you do go! And, you earned yourself a snack.

Sweeping

“A 30-minute dance with the broom will burn off 136 calories,” said SHAPE.

Vacuuming

Between all the walking, turning, twisting, and bending, vacuuming can burn 170 calories in an hour.

Mopping

Have a lot of hard surface floors in your home instead of carpet? Grab that mop. An hour’s worth of mopping can burn 170 calories, too.

Washing floors

“Extra dirty” floors may be a good thing in this case. “If your floors require a little extra elbow grease, you can shed as many as 187 calories in just 30 minutes,” said Shape.

Rearranging your closet

Whether it’s time to swap out summer duds for winter sweaters or you just need to clean out a closet that’s overstuffed, this task can burn about 85 calories.

Mowing the lawn

How about taking your tidying tasks outdoor? If your lawn is in need of some manicuring, you’ll love the fact that this type of home improvement activity can burn a whopping 300 calories in an hour. If it only takes you 20 minutes, you “can burn more calories than a power walk,” said Health. “But there’s a catch: you have to mow with a push mower. You may feel like you’re living on the frontier, but a push mower will turn your backyard into a boot camp!”

Tips For Decorating Rooms That Are Long And Narrow

WRITTEN BY KATE BURT

Tips For Decorating Rooms That Are Long And NarrowCotton Tree Interiors

Distract attention away from an awkward room shape and create a pleasing design using these pro tips.

When you’re clicking through images of gorgeous rooms to gather inspiration for your home, does it sometimes seem as though the ideas will work only in large or pleasingly proportioned rooms? The truth is, when a room is well designed, we don’t notice when it’s awkwardly shaped. Here, three interior designers share their tips for dealing with a common type of awkward space – a long, narrow room.

“The challenge you face with a long, thin living space is to ensure the room feels welcoming, inviting and free flowing,” says Letiche Black of Amberth. “You want to avoid it looking too static or formal.”

Make sure the seating area doesn’t feel too far away from the TV and other necessities.

“The biggest challenge will be not to feel obliged to push everything against the walls, because you will only emphasize the narrow shape and corners and be left with a slim walkway,” she says. “The space will feel tight and cramped instead of open and light.”

 

Diana Greenhalgh of My Bespoke Room suggests creating areas of color, as in this room. “These will draw the eye to certain points around the room to help break up the space,” she says.

Maximize space with style. Greenhalgh suggests making a feature of details that will maximize the feeling of space in a narrow room. “Space-saving solutions such as small shelves instead of bedside tables, and hanging pendant lights instead of bulky bedside lights, can help make the most of the available space, and also assist by creating an interesting focal point,” she says.

Focus on lighting. In a long, thin living area, Black recommends putting seating areas near the main natural light source. “This will influence how you design the rest of the space and encourages a loose placement of other furniture,” she says. “Position armchairs away from the wall, as this tricks the eye into believing the space is much wider.”

Section it off. “Break a long room into sections by cleverly placing furniture,” says Charlotte Ford of Cotton Tree Interiors. “Console tables are really useful when placed at the back of a sofa,” she notes. “And if possible, get some floor-mounted sockets, so lamps can be put on them to bring in subtle lighting and create a soft divide.” She also advises looking at the size of your furniture. You can buy slimmer sofas and other scaled-down pieces that will fit well in the space.

Take the textural route. Black suggests introducing plenty of texture into a thin room. “Create layers and warmth that will allow your senses to be met with an arrangement of smooth, rough and shiny surfaces, instead of lonely corners,” she says. “Use mirrors too, as these will help the space to feel wider.” In a bedroom, Greenhalgh advises considering the position of the bed with care, as it will probably be the focal point. Placing a bed at the end of a narrow space, as seen in this room, plays up the room’s shape in a stylish way.

Open up. In a narrow bedroom, Black says, choose colors that make the space feel wider and brighter. “It is important to be mindful of the space as a whole, ensuring one end doesn’t get neglected or feel darker than the other,” she says. “Don’t be tempted to simply position your bed, desk and other furniture all down one wall, as you will only add emphasis to the long, narrow shape of the room.” She suggests using warm, light grays, off-whites and whites. “These shades instantly create a brighter, more open space,” she says.

Distract the eye. “Use neutral window treatments, as drawing attention to the boundaries at either end of the room only emphasizes its shape,” Ford says. “Use pattern, texture and color on occasional chairs, cushions, lampshades and art and also carefully positioned wallpaper, all of which take the focus off the shape of the room and direct it on to the more interesting objects.”

Find your focal point. One of the difficulties in decorating a narrow room is deciding where the focus of the space should be, Ford says. If you are working with a builder, ask to create subtle room dividers. “Full-length narrow columns break up the room, giving a natural finishing point when using different wallpapers and paint colors,” she says.

Don’t be afraid of the dark. “If the room is dark due to lack of windows,” Greenhalgh says, “go with it and embrace a dark color palette to make the space cozy, rather than trying to fight it.”

Go round. Choosing accessories in shapes that go against the linear nature of a long room — such as circular forms — is another trick to visually widen a space. “Avoid stripes, as these will only enhance the long, thin feel,” Greenhalgh says.

Avoid the “corridor effect”. “Choose items that can be positioned to break up the feeling of a long, thin room, such as small coffee tables, side tables or armchairs,” Greenhalgh says. “Break up the corridor effect by positioning pieces of furniture in clusters, instead of in a row.” This tricks the eye into seeing a wider space. “For example, pick different seating options and arrange them together, instead of having just one long sofa against the long wall,” she says. And don’t be afraid to use bold furnishings, fixtures and fittings, Black advises, noting that they will add visual interest.

Light it right. Bedroom lighting needs to be well considered in a narrow space, as there often isn’t sufficient surface area for table lamps. Ford suggests installing downlights, as they spread the light across the room. Then, if you have the luxury of enough space, “have a softer, secondary lighting plan with a combination of bedside lamps, reading lamps and table lamps,” she advises. Wall-mounted reading lights can also help to declutter bedside surfaces where space is tight.

Get horizontal. When deciding on the position of the bed in a narrow room, if space allows, “break up the space by positioning the bed across the width of the space instead of up against the length of one,” Black says. Sometimes, however, you have no choice but to position the bed going with the length of the room and facing the door. And there are benefits to that. “It feels welcoming and will take your eye off the shape of the room,” she says. “Especially if you use lots of pillows to add comfort and warmth.”

melting-watch

MARKET WATCH

Single Family Home Activity in the Antelope Valley

In the last 24 hours
10/14/17

New Listings …  29
Sold …  35
Pending …  32
Expd/Wthd/Cancld …  05
Price Increases …  02
Price Reductions …  16
Number of listings* …  1083
Average Days on Market …  81
Short sale/pay listings …  12
Equity listings …  958
Bank owned listings …  18
HUD, Corp, Probate and Auction listings …  47
Days of inventory (at the average rate**) …  26.25
Days of inventory (at yesterdays rate**) …  27.08
Actual Number of days of inventory***  …  98.45

View the last 8+ years of data HERE!

SELECT THE CHART TO VIEW
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New Listings on the Market

Closed (Sold) Transactions

Pending Units

Expired Listings

Price Increases

Price Decreases

Total Number of Listings

Days of Inventory 

Average Selling Price

Monthly Selling Price Points
(Price extremes at the end of the month)

Daily Day’s on the Market

Monthly Day’s on the Market

Total Sort Pays

Sold by Month

Total Sales in Last 12 Months

Avg. Number of Solds per Month over 12 Months

 

* Count includes all ACTIVE and CONTINGENT MLS listings
** Assuming no future growth or reduction
*** At yesterdays depletion rate (∞ indicates negative depletion,
inventory would not be depleted at this sales rate)
ALL DATA WAS DERIVED FROM THE “GREATER ANTELOPE VALLEY
ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®” AND IS DEEMED RELIABLE.
THE CALCULATIONS OF THAT DATA IS THE
RESPONSIBILITY OF DON GOCKEL, REALTOR®